BusinessIndustrial

Packaging Quality Matters To Your Customers

By 27/08/2017February 13th, 2018No Comments

What do you think your customers’ first impression is when they receive a product from you in the post? Would you like to think that your customers feel your business is professional? Worryingly research shows us that 33% of customers perceive a company as unprofessional if their product arrives in poor packaging that looks like the product inside could be easily damaged, or if the packaging is damaged.

All that money you have spent on advertising and marketing, taking the right pictures of the product, writing the right content and using the right words, attracting the target audience to your website and your products is wasted by poor quality packaging.

Other research has shown that 50% of consumers will return a product if the outer packaging is damaged and this is all money that your company is set to lose by using the wrong packaging on your products for delivery. ‘That will do’ will never be the right approach to your packaging, yet that is the approach that many businesses take as in their minds, the sale is done.

When thinking about packaging for your products it is also worth noting the ‘WOW’ impact; this is the feeling the customer gets on receipt of their order from your business. This positive impact will then be how the customer will perceive your business and will then create a positive reaction when the customer talks about your business to others in the future.

The ‘WOW’ impact can be created through graphics on the outside of the packaging, or it could be something special inside that makes them stop and think; a personal note, a free gift or similar are brilliant ways of thinking ‘inside the box’, we have mentioned other examples of ‘thinking inside the box’ in previous blog posts.

Amazon is the world’s largest ecommerce business and they are a company who are certainly getting their packaging and delivery policies right. Ask anyone that has every received a package direct from Amazon if the product wasn’t in perfect condition and you’ll struggle to find anyone that says no.

Can your business really afford to get packaging wrong?